HOA KỲ & ĐỒNG MINH – CHIẾN TRANH VIỆT NAM: Chiến tranh Việt Nam Loạt phim về Chiến trường VN Phần 4/12 Đối đầu trong Tam Giác Sắt – Vietnam war – The Showdown in the Iron Triangle 4/12 – Battlefield Series (Vietnam War) Full HD


HOA KỲ & ĐỒNG MINH – CHIẾN TRANH VIỆT NAM: Chiến tranh Việt Nam Loạt phim về Chiến trường VN Phần 4/12 Đối đầu trong Tam Giác Sắt – Vietnam war – The Showdown in the Iron Triangle 4/12 – Battlefield Series (Vietnam War) Full HD

Published on Sep 16, 2016

https://www.facebook.com/hannahvan.tran/posts/226984297737746

 

Để có thêm nhiều Phim Ảnh, Phim Tài Liệu liên quan đến: HOA KỲ & ĐỒNG MINH – CHIẾN TRANH VIỆT NAM; VIỆT NAM CỘNG HOÀ; KHOA HỌC QUÂN SỰ…

Chúng tôi sẽ chọn và đăng thêm những Phim Ảnh, Phim Tài Liệu phiên bản Anh Ngữ. Nhằm phục vụ người xem giải trí hoặc tìm hiểu.

Chúng tôi hy vọng khi đăng tải các loại Phim phiên bản Anh Ngữ, cũng sẽ giúp ích cho nhiều người trao dồi thêm vốn liếng Anh Ngữ của mình. Đồng thời, hiểu biết thêm những sự kiện có thật trong Lịch Sữ Chiến Tranh Việt Nam.Thay vì, lâu nay bị Bọn CS tuyên truyền láo khoét và bưng bít thông tin.

Kính mong Quý vị thông cảm, chúng tôi không có nhiều thời gian để lược dịch nội dung Phim hoặc thêm kỹ thuật Phụ Đề Tiếng Việt. Nhưng với lòng chân thành muốn phục vụ Quý vị.

Trân trọng cảm ơn Quý vị đã theo dõi.

The Vietnam War (Vietnamese: Chiến tranh Việt Nam), also known as the Second Indochina War,[32] and also known in Vietnam as Resistance War Against America (Vietnamese: Kháng chiến chống Mỹ) or simply the American War, was a Cold War-era proxy war[33] that occurred in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia from 1 November 1955[A 1] to the fall of Saigon on 30 April 1975. This war followed the First Indochina War (1946–54) and was fought between North Vietnam—supported by the Soviet Union, China and other communist allies—and the government of South Vietnam—supported by the United States and other anti-communist allies.[38] The Viet Cong (also known as the National Liberation Front, or NLF), a South Vietnamese communist common front aided by the North, fought a guerrilla war against anti-communist forces in the region. The People’s Army of Vietnam (also known as the North Vietnamese Army) engaged in a more conventional war, at times committing large units to battle.

As the war continued, the part of the Viet Cong in the fighting decreased as the role of the NVA grew. U.S. and South Vietnamese forces relied on air superiority and overwhelming firepower to conduct search and destroy operations, involving ground forces, artillery, and airstrikes. In the course of the war, the U.S. conducted a large-scale strategic bombing campaign against North Vietnam, and over time the North Vietnamese airspace became the most heavily defended in the world.

The U.S. government viewed American involvement in the war as a way to prevent a Communist takeover of South Vietnam. This was part of a wider containment strategy, with the stated aim of stopping the spread of communism. According to the U.S. domino theory, if one state went Communist, other states in the region would follow, and U.S. policy thus held that Communist rule over all of Vietnam was unacceptable. The North Vietnamese government and the Viet Cong were fighting to reunify Vietnam under communist rule. They viewed the conflict as a colonial war, fought initially against forces from France and then America, as France was backed by the U.S., and later against South Vietnam, which it regarded as a U.S. puppet state.[39]

Beginning in 1950, American military advisors arrived in what was then French Indochina.[40][A 3] U.S. involvement escalated in the early 1960s, with troop levels tripling in 1961 and again in 1962.[41] U.S. involvement escalated further following the 1964 Gulf of Tonkin incident, in which a U.S. destroyer clashed with North Vietnamese fast attack craft, which was followed by the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution, which gave the U.S. president authorization to increase U.S. military presence. Regular U.S. combat units were deployed beginning in 1965. Operations crossed international borders: bordering areas of Laos and Cambodia were heavily bombed by U.S. forces as American involvement in the war peaked in 1968, the same year that the communist side launched the Tet Offensive. The Tet Offensive failed in its goal of overthrowing the South Vietnamese government but became the turning point in the war, as it persuaded a large segment of the United States population that its government’s claims of progress toward winning the war were illusory despite many years of massive U.S. military aid to South Vietnam.

Disillusionment with the war by the U.S. led to the gradual withdrawal of U.S. ground forces as part of a policy known as Vietnamization, which aimed to end American involvement in the war while transferring the task of fighting the Communists to the South Vietnamese themselves. Despite the Paris Peace Accord, which was signed by all parties in January 1973, the fighting continued. In the U.S. and the Western world, a large anti-Vietnam War movement developed. This movement was part of a larger Counterculture of the 1960s.

Direct U.S. military involvement ended on 15 August 1973 as a result of the Case–Church Amendment passed by the U.S. Congress.[42] The capture of Saigon by the North Vietnamese Army in April 1975 marked the end of the war, and North and South Vietnam were reunified the following year. The war exacted a huge human cost in terms of fatalities (see Vietnam War casualties). Estimates of the number of Vietnamese service members and civilians killed vary from 800,000[43] to 3.1 million.[24][44][45] Some 200,000–300,000 Cambodians,[29][30][31] 20,000–200,000 Laotians,[46][47][48][49][50][51] and 58,220 U.S. service members also died in the conflict.[A 2]
http://wikipedia.org

Source: Battlefield Series 

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